Simon Tisdall spews garbage about Russia in the Guardian

Liberals hate Russia, Russians and Putin. They hate Putin because he is a somewhat authoritarian figure who has been immensely successful in uniting and leading Russia. Under his rule the economy has strengthened and stabilized – strong enough to weather the storm of Western sanctions and a collapse in world oil prices and still show modest growth. The country continues to be modernised and infrastructure developed. Corruption at a senior level has been tackled. All this can be confirmed by reading the work of experts from e.g. the OECD. Don’t get your picture about Russia from delusional hate-mongers like Tisdall. Continue reading “Simon Tisdall spews garbage about Russia in the Guardian”

Dots and lines – delusions about Russia

I’ve tagged this piece to link it to my series on Anti-Russian propaganda in the UK press. But really it belongs in a special category of its own devoted to the ravings of Guardian journalist Luke Harding. Harding – who was once posted to Moscow (and whose tenure ended when the Russians declined to renew his Visa – a matter which he depicts as being ‘thrown out’ of Russia) – is notorious for his “join the dots” journalism on Russia. (His words). For Harding “joining the dots” means inventing all sorts of stories which – for Harding at least – must be true because they are the only possible explanation which connects some dots. He shows you the dots – simple facts in the public domain – and then claims that the dots prove the lines – his stories which “connect the dots”.  He is informing us about the lines which must be there because of the dots. The alternative explanation is that the lines are purely in Harding’s own head.

Continue reading “Dots and lines – delusions about Russia”

Russia – a country or a demon?

This may seem like a small point; just a throw-away line in a single Guardian article. But I pick on it because it seems indicative of a certain perspective. The comment appears in an article on some sort of a spy scandal in Serbia. (Allegations of a Russian spy paying off a Serbian official; good TV but hardly news – all spy agencies pay informers/agents in ‘enemy’ and even ‘allied’ countries all the time). The article is by Shaun Walker who used to be based in Moscow where he churned out a series of anti-Russia propaganda articles.  This is what struck me: Continue reading “Russia – a country or a demon?”

Guardian lies on Russia

There are two Guardian “journalists” stationed in Moscow (as far as I can see).

Neither of them can, it seems, open their mouths without telling lies. Not little spins or fibs to help the “Putin is a bad man and Russia is a dictatorship” fairytale along – but outright lies. Continue reading “Guardian lies on Russia”

One-side reporting in the Guardian

And so it goes on. This is Shaun Walker in the Guardian at it again.

And again – the basics of journalism require an objective detachment. A journalist takes a step back and makes sure that the whole picture emerges from his reporting. In wartime we understand and accept that journalists are going to produce a constant stream of propaganda – talking up our victories, demonizing the enemy, producing an entirely one-sided narrative. But when this happens in peacetime what it means is that ‘journalists’ are trying to create the conditions for war. This is the precise opposite of what journalism should do. Responsible and professional journalism should try to present both sides – even if the other side is a geopolitical opponent – and so inform people and hopefully contribute to balanced opinion-forming and decision making. Continue reading “One-side reporting in the Guardian”