Hague threatens to storm the Ecuadorian embassy

In a last bid attempt to prevent Ecuador giving political asylum to Julian Assange Mr Hague threatened to storm the Ecuadorian embassy in London.  The text of a letter sent by Mr Hague to the Ecuadorians read: Continue reading “Hague threatens to storm the Ecuadorian embassy”

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Review of Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed

First published in 1968 this is a world-famous work on pedagogy in the context of a struggle for liberation. The educational criticism and theory is developed in the context of a Marxist dialectic. Even outside of that political context the book still has huge value as a pointer to an approach to teaching which is based on solidarity and not manipulation and oppression.

Continue reading “Review of Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed”

A review of The Dangerous Rise in Therapeutic Education by Ecclestone and Hayes

The book is about the trend in education, at all levels, from primary through secondary to
FE and University towards a new prioritisation of the emotions in learning. Overall a very good depiction of how the folksy, unscientific, notions of psychotherapy are being used to build a new and disturbing kind of ‘education’ in Britain’s state funded schools.

Original Publication Date: 2009

Continue reading “A review of The Dangerous Rise in Therapeutic Education by Ecclestone and Hayes”

Biometric Surveillance in Schools

This paper details the extent of biometric surveillance technology in schools as the state was in 2009. Finger-printing devices for library systems, dinner queues and registration are wide-spread. The (now defunct) quango BECTA (concerned to promote technology in education) chillingly welcomed all this as being more ”efficient”.

Biometric Surveillance in Schools

Pub: March 2009 (original publication date)

A critique of the review into Home Education carried out in 2009 (under the last Labour government).

This review, by a leading social worker with a background in local authority education, inevitably found that more regulation and monitoring of the as yet relatively unmolested home education sector was needed. Not unusually for the time a few extreme cases of child abuse were used to justify the proposed new powers, whose primary manifestation was to extend a blanket of surveillance over everyone rather than limit the interventions of the authorities to cases where abuse was actually a problem. A new layer of legislation was proposed which would have created the ˜tools” for this blanket surveillance of the sector. However, the proposed legislation did not make into onto the statute book before the 2010 election and has not been taken up by the new administration.

Original publication date June 2009

Badman Review into Home Education (PDF)