Brexit – a failure of party political ‘democracy’

Democracy means government by the people.

With party politics as practiced in the UK we have two dinosaurs tottering about the landscape each trying to make itself relevant and ‘popular’ while fighting each other to death. Continue reading “Brexit – a failure of party political ‘democracy’”

Anti-semitism and the State of Israel

Let’s look at the article in the Guardian , which we reviewed in our last post, in more detail. The context is that Derek Hatton, a long-time maverick member of the Labour Party and agitator from within it, was readmitted to membership of the Party last week – only to be immediately suspended in connection with an “anti-Semitic tweet”. The web post dates from 6 years ago. (In this new ideology there is no place for time, for forgiveness).

Continue reading “Anti-semitism and the State of Israel”

The blind faith in victims

One strand in the current hysterical ideology which grips Britain is the belief that the victim is always right. If someone says they are a victim then, they are. This flies in the face of ideas which have taken centuries to evolve and which have their roots in the traditions of our Anglo-Saxon forebears as concerns juries, witnesses, due process etc.

Continue reading “The blind faith in victims”

Russia experts in the West

The Western media touts a bizarre array of so-called experts on Russia. These range from Western academics who simply live in delusional universes of their own making to dissidents who, like most dissidents, know which side their bread is buttered and will say what their new masters in MI6 and NATO require. (The media usually slavishly reports whatever they say without doubting a morsel). Many of these experts work for “think-tanks” with clear links to the Western war machine. Continue reading “Russia experts in the West”

Transitioning to democracy with the usual lies

The UK has backed the US in supporting Juan Guaidó, head of the parliament in Venezuela, against the elected President Nicolás Maduro. Even if Maduro fixed the election it is a short-circuit to go from there to intervention – as we have now.

The UK’s Foreign Secretary has said: “This regime has done untold damage to the people of Venezuela, 10% of the population have left Venezuela such is the misery they are suffering”. “Regime” is a keyword. Despite doubts over the integrity of the recent elections in Venezuela the current President still has more claims on democracy than, say, the leaders of Saudi Arabia who we are unlikely to find the UK Foreign Secretary calling a “regime” (bad for business). “Regime” legitimises intervention. And we know where that ends up… Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Libya. No stand-out success stories there. Just lots of corpses.

As for people leaving because of the economic problems caused by the “regime”. It may be true that the government is partly responsible for the economic crisis in Venezuela. However; US sanctions have played a significant part. These sanctions include prohibitions on US citizens financing government debt or investment in the state oil company in Venezuela. The effect of this will have been to make oil production more expensive which means in turn less government revenue. The crisis, the “misery”, which Jeremy Hunt cites as a reason to conduct a regime change operation in Venezuela is in fact something which has (at least partly) been caused by them. (US and UK are synonymous in Foreign Policy terms). An enormous lie. And one which will most likely pass by 100% unquestioned by the media – as it does, for example, in this Guardian article.