Fake news on the Salisbury suspects?

This is the Guardian’s report on a ‘report’ from ‘Bellingcat’ about the two British named suspects in the alleged Skripal poisoning.

‘Bellingcat’ is a web site which publishes ‘investigations’ based on ‘social media research’ which usually find Russia guilty of something.

This website realised that ‘Bellingcat’ was a fraud after reviewing their report into the downing of the MH17 flight over Ukraine. In this report ‘Bellingcat’ shows a total lack of understanding of forensic science – for example making inferences based on different colours in the ground – when the images being compared come from two different cameras. The word ‘calibration’ appears to be unknown to ‘Bellingcat’. In the same report they demonstrate a critical failure to understand how the software they are using to analyse apparent changes in jpeg files actually works.

It is a sign therefore not only of the frantic desire to accept anything which says Russia is bad but also of the very poor state of intellectual honesty and ability amongst those who pass for journalists in Britain today that the press has largely lapped it all up without noticing the glaring deficiencies.

This is in today’s Guardian report on the latest ‘Bellingcat’ ‘investigation’:

Bellingcat has frequently sparred with Russian military and diplomatic officials, who have claimed without evidence that Bellingcat fabricates evidence and is a front for foreign intelligence services.

However – the evidence that (at least in some cases) ‘fabricate’ is exactly what ‘Bellingcat’ does is there for all to see.

(We can add that this claim appears in an article in which Bellingcat is reported as declining to reveal the sources which provided them with a secret database of Russian passports…. Not MI6 by any chance???)

Update.

Craig Murray occasionally makes mistakes – but this looks like quite a strong post on the ‘Bellingcat’ ‘evidence’. Note, especially, the BBC report on the matter only using the two photos which are agreed to be Boshirov.

 

 

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