Guardian propaganda watch continued

It is hard to keep up with the Guardian’s anti-Russia propaganda.

Here are two examples from recent reports on developments in the Skripal case – the release of photographs of the alleged perpetrators:

Dmitry Gudkov, a Russian opposition politician, tweeted: “Meet Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, suspected by Britain of the poisoning of the Skripals. Possible MPs in the next parliament!”

Gudkov’s tweet was an allusion to Andrei Lugovoi, the former KGB agent who was accused by Britain of murdering the Kremlin critic Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210, a rare radioactive isotope, in London in 2006. Lugovoi was elected to the Russian parliament in 2007 and now earns a reported £400,000 a year as an MP. He was also awarded a state honour by Putin. [1]

To describe Litvinenko as a “Kremlin critic” is part of creating the narrative “Putin murders his critics”. In fact Litvinenko was an ex Russian spy, turned traitor, who was working for British intelligence at the time of his assassination. The narrative that Putin murders double-agents doesn’t have quite the same ring to it which is why Litvinenko is described as a “Kremlin critic”.

According to RT which is likely to be better informed than Marc Bennetts for the Guardian a State Duma MP earns about USD 80,000.00 p.a. Marc Bennett’s £400,000.00 “as an MP” appears to be “fake news”.

 

This is a piece of creative writing from Luke Harding.  Whereas the police are content to present the facts such as they have them Harding is eager to join the dots with his fictional tale of a plane “trundling down an icy runway” (yes – it is always icy in Moscow Luke and that’s probably why they have ice in their hearts). “On hostile territory, Boshirov and Petrov operated in the manner of classic intelligence operatives” – that is on their way to a political assassination which would have massive repercussions for their country they allowed themselves to be captured without disguises by CCTV multiple times.

The Russian state may have been responsible for the apparent Skripal poisoning. It may have been a “rogue element” in Russia – or it could have been the work of another intelligence agency setting Russia up. There’s nothing wrong from a journalistic point of view of doing some reportage and arguing for one interpretation of the facts. But we don’t see this in the British press. We see these attempts to spin narratives – narratives which are fed to them by the State Department / MI6 + Downing Street – which they do by being selective with the facts, adding narrative glosses and relying exclusively on the views of Anti-Russia “think-tanks” and dissidents. And this rush to spin the narrative when any reasonable jury is still out should give us pause for consideration.

Notes

1. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/05/putin-signed-decree-on-freelance-spies-days-before-skripal-claims

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